A George II Mahogany Reader’s Companion – Part Five

The weather in Victoria of late has been some of the coldest in recent history. Finding a day – or even the odd half hour – of fine and moderately temperate weather in which to polish a piece of furniture in the open air has been challenging to say the least. With a vigilant eye on the forecasts, I ventured out the other day and began polishing the reader’s companion, but twenty minutes later the sun dropped below the roofline, instantaneously transforming The Lemon Studio into a chasm of intolerable crepuscular and algific conditions. Within two minutes, the polish went from being relatively free flowing to something more akin to peanut butter.

By the law of averages, good things come to those dim-witted enough to heed old adages. The table is now polished.

The brass drawer knobs required a little caressing to bring them up to standard before being aged in the Bucket of Wrath. The knobs were attached to the drawers and the whole table was then given a good waxing.

The completed reader’s companion.

Contra view.

Side panel and drawer.

Drawer and brass knob.

Rounded leg post.

Shaped side and back panels.

Back panel.

Cabriole leg.

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About Jack Plane

Formerly from the UK, Jack is a retired antiques dealer and self-taught woodworker, now living in Australia.
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6 Responses to A George II Mahogany Reader’s Companion – Part Five

  1. Robert R Lindh,Western Pa.USA. says:

    Again,a work of art!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Like

  2. Jeff Aldred says:

    Hi Jack:
    That is beautiful!
    I would really really like to see you “polish it up” some time. What makes your work so amazing is both the execution in wood, then making it look like it has been lovingly used for a couple hundred years. Magic!

    Like

  3. Gary Newland says:

    Hi Jack,
    I have been fascinated with your whole blog since I discovered it a couple of months ago. You do fantastic work and very good descriptions with history. If you have the time, I too would be very interested in your finishing methods. Thank you for taking the time to share your talents.
    Gary

    Like

  4. Tico Vogt says:

    How about a video tour of all this wonderful work “in situ”?

    Like

    • Jack Plane says:

      Hmmm… there are several problems with that proposal; the first of which is, I don’t possess a video camera and secondly, this reader’s companion and a good few other items were recently gifted to others.

      Like

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