A George III Mahogany Kneehole Desk – Part Six

The reason for the long break between dispatches is because my efforts have been focused on building a rather large wooden vessel capable of accommodating my family and all manner of other creatures that have recently congregated on a nearby hill. But now that the rains have thankfully receded to the point I can reach my bench in the Lemon Studio wearing just galoshes on my feet, work on the kneehole desk has recommenced.

Drawer construction is the same as for the cabinet on chest (the same period and style), so to spare you the sense of déjà vu, I won’t trouble you by repeating the process again here. After cleaning up and ensuring a nice sliding fit in the carcase, the drawer fronts will be rebated to receive cockbeading.

Drawer in the rough.

The escutcheons on this piece are of the flush-mounted cast ‘wire’ or ‘ribbon’ variety: They  are tapped into tight fitting keyholes and then scraped flush with the drawer fronts.

Pairs of drawer stops were rubbed onto the drawer dividers and the drawers were all carefully positioned in their respective openings.

The kneehole desk in-the-white.

The rain is again falling as I type this – it is early winter after all.

Jack Plane

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About Jack Plane

Formerly from the UK, Jack is a retired antiques dealer and self-taught woodworker, now living in Australia.
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2 Responses to A George III Mahogany Kneehole Desk – Part Six

  1. Les Elsie says:

    Dear Jack,

    First let me comment that I’m a fan of your blog and appreciate the work you put into it. My questions deal with the picture of the upended drawer from the mahogany desk in Part 6. What drew my attention was the construction of the drawer. What I see is the lack of a 1/2 tail on the bottom of the drawer, the miters on the ends of the sides at the back, and the drawer sides which seem to be a bit proud of the face board at the bottom. All of these seem atypical to how drawers are usually seen in the States. I’m also curious on how you added the cockbead. Did you just rebate the cockbead to the depth of the blind DT all around or rebate a full width cockbead on the top in which case a solid surface is seen across the top of the drawer rather then a seam from the applied bead.

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    • Jack Plane says:

      The kudos is much appreciated.

      The drawer in the image in A George III Mahogany Kneehole Desk – Part Six is upside down. If you look at the uppermost front corner, you’ll see the half dovetail on the bottom of the drawer.

      I’m afraid I don’t follow what you mean by “… the miters on the ends of the sides at the back …” There are no mitres in the construction of these drawers.

      With regard to “… the drawer sides which seem to be a bit proud of the face board at the bottom.” The drawer in the image is unfinished. The drawer sides and runners are still proud of the drawer front. When I finally fit the drawers to the carcase, the sides/runners are fine tuned with a plane to provide the minutest clearance for the bottom of the drawer front.

      The cockbeading procedure is covered in the second paragraph in A George III Mahogany Kneehole Desk – Part Six with a link to Part Three.

      JP

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