Picture This IV

After posting recently about an automaton table clock by James Smith of London, a kindred automaton clock is coming up for sale at the Salisbury salerooms of Woolley & Wallis  on the 26th of March, 2013 (lot 129).

Robert_Henderson__automaton_bracket_clock_c1768-1805_01aA George III striking mahogany automaton bracket clock by Robert Henderson, fl.1768 – 1805.

The arch is painted with a scene portraying two blacksmiths shaping a horseshoe on an anvil, both with automaton arms and hammers. In an adjoining loosebox, a farrier is shoeing a horse.

Robert_Henderson__automaton_bracket_clock_c1768-1805_01bAutomaton blacksmiths and farrier.

Jack Plane

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About Jack Plane

Formerly from the UK, Jack is a retired antiques dealer and self-taught woodworker, now living in Australia.
This entry was posted in Clocks, Picture This and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Picture This IV

  1. burbidge says:

    Is this just an example of a fashion for bucolic scenes ( à la Marie-Antoinette’s ‘Hameau’), or were such items ever commissioned purchases of the newly affluent (alluding to the source of their prosperity)?

    cheers,
    Burbidge.

    Like

    • Jack Plane says:

      Despite the apparent indifference displayed by the aristocracy towards the great unwashed on the small- and silver screens, a great many of the haut monde actually took a keen interest in agriculture, engineering and the sciences etc. (George III – ‘Farmer George’ – was himself, an ardent agriculturist).

      Automaton longcase clocks with their simple bobbing ships were likely commissioned by gentlemen with an interest in, or family connection to the sea. Likewise, the carpenter automaton and the blacksmith/farrier automaton clocks were possibly made for an architect/builder and a race horse owner respectively… perhaps… maybe.

      JP

      Like

  2. Eric R says:

    Wonderful detail on the insets and the case work.
    I’m sure these items brought much amusement.
    Thank you Mr Jack Plane

    Like

  3. Mike Siemsen says:

    The blacksmith is a good theme for this as the hammer blows would be timed with the striking of the bell

    Like

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