Star-Spangled Composer

John Stafford Smith was born this day in 1750. While still a teenager, the Gloucester choir boy and organist composed the rousing music for what would be the song, To Anacreon In Heaven – the anthem of a London amateur musicians’ club, the Anacreontic Society.

James_Gillray__Anacreontick's_in_full_Song_c1801_01aJames Gillray, Anacreontick’s in full Song, circa 1801.

In 1814, following the defence of Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore, a Georgetown lawyer by the name of Francis Scott Key wrote a poem, imaginatively entitled Defence of Fort McHenry.

Key’s popular poem was subsequently set to the music of Smith’s To Anacreon In Heaven, and became known as The Star-Spangled Banner – made famous by 1960’s guitarist, Jimi Hendrix.

Jack Plane

Advertisements

About Jack Plane

Formerly from the UK, Jack is a retired antiques dealer and self-taught woodworker, now living in Australia.
This entry was posted in Distractions and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to Star-Spangled Composer

  1. Keith says:

    And possibly famous by the fact that it is the United Stated National Anthem.

    Like

  2. Bill Rypka says:

    Wonderful weave of classic rock and roll into your blog on classic furniture! Jimi Hendrix was truly classic!

    Like

  3. Jim says:

    Fancy that, the US national anthem being based on music to a Greek poet famous for his drinking songs. “O say can you see”, could take on a completely different meaning in that context.

    Like

  4. Yankee Woodworker says:

    And with that I must resolve to ignore all your future blogs. Thanks for the eArly morning insults.

    Like

  5. Jack Plane says:

    I clicked the ‘Like’ button at the bottom of this post by mistake and received the following notification from WordPress…

    “You liked your own post on Pegs and ‘Tails
    You’re so vain. You probably think Star-Spangled Composer is about you.”

    Serves me right!

    Like

I welcome your comments

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s