A George I Simulated Tortoiseshell Girandole – Part Four

The candle arms required only the minimum of fettling prior to gold lacquering them to match the gilding on the frame.

A suspension wire was attached to the back of the girandole and the candle arm mounts were then screwed to the skirt.

ggtg_150513_01aThe completed girandole.

The looking glass was hand bevelled by the friendly people at Monash Glass.

Jack Plane

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About Jack Plane

Formerly from the UK, Jack is a retired antiques dealer and self-taught woodworker, now living in Australia.
This entry was posted in Mirrors & Girandoles and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to A George I Simulated Tortoiseshell Girandole – Part Four

  1. Simply outstanding.

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  2. LD says:

    Should the reader assume that the glass was aged using the process described in ‘A George II Walnut Fretwork Mirror – Part Three’ ?

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    • Jack Plane says:

      Indeed, though that adorable pup is now an unmanageable, typically cantankerous terrier who doesn’t cherish the same attention, nor take kindly to being used as an applicator for ageing looking glasses.

      Both my arms are currently bandaged to the elbows.

      JP

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  3. D.B. Laney says:

    Wow!

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  4. Kevin L. Schroeder says:

    Is there a chance you could provide a closeup of the simulated tortoiseshell pattern for us to view? This is something that has always facinated me, and I have no clue as to how to produce it.

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  5. Ian Wells says:

    Thanks once again Jack, I find your projects are providing me with a newfound appreciation and depth of understanding of the furniture/Arts and its place in the history of this period (17th & 18th C.) that had eluded me before. Consequently my (lack of) understanding of prior and subsequent periods is coming under renewed scrutiny now that the missing link has been found. Thanks once again for your efforts and sharing of knowledge.

    regards
    Ian

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