Picture This CVI

When preparing another post recently, I noticed something a little peculiar about this rather glorious chest of drawers (fig. 1). Study figures 1, 2 & 3 for the foible before scrolling down to figure 4.

Fig. 1. “George II mahogany serpentine commode with fine original rococo handles, circa 1755”. (James Graham-Stewart)

Fig. 2. Rococo escutcheon. (James Graham-Stewart)

Fig. 3. Lovely rococo handle. (James Graham-Stewart).

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Fig. 4. That’s better! (James Graham-Stewart)

The top of the escutcheons are too tall for the offset of the chosen locks’ drill pins, necessitating them being rotated 180° in order to clear the cockbeading.

Jack Plane

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About Jack Plane

Formerly from the UK, Jack is a retired antiques dealer and self-taught woodworker, now living in Australia.
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4 Responses to Picture This CVI

  1. Warwick says:

    You did well to spot it.

    Like

  2. potomacker says:

    Furnituremaking rule #5: Always purchase hardware before constructions begins.

    Like

  3. Joe says:

    Absolute amateur, but surrounding the lock escutcheons is the stain from polish over the years.
    The “fine original rococo handles” show no staining, and the one singled out for a close up looks as if there was something with three screws there previously. Looks as if there is a plugged hole to the left and an open hole above.

    Joe H

    Like

    • Jack Plane says:

      Yes, the dark areas surrounding the escutcheons are from grime/wax build up.

      I certainly see the hole/damage at the top of the handle, but I’m not sure I see any plugged holes. Having said that, I find it odd there is staining partially hidden to the left of the handle and I can’t explain the hole/damage – hence the description in quotation marks.

      JP

      Like

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