Tag Archives: furniture

Cross-Grained Mouldings

Mouldings on oak-framed buildings – and thence joiner-made oak furniture – followed the timber’s grain and were comparatively simple to produce. Then circa 1685, a new breed of specialised furniture maker appeared. Cabinetmakers developed more sophisticated techniques for making and … Continue reading

Posted in Antiques, Furniture Timbers, Techniques | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

Shaker: Function, Purity, Perfection

Shaker: Function, Purity, Perfection is an homage to the traditional Shaker values of grace and simplicity. Featured are twenty-eight essential pieces that highlight the defining elements of Shaker design and demonstrate a dedication to perfection. Designer and furniture expert Sir … Continue reading

Posted in Exhibitions | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

A William and Mary Simulated Tortoiseshell Chest of Drawers – Part One

The next little job is a late seventeenth-century William and Mary simulated tortoiseshell chest with two short drawers over three long drawers. This chest is very similar in design to the William and Mary walnut chest of drawers that I … Continue reading

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Embroidered Furniture at Montacute House

From my absolute favourite English house, Andrew May, on the National Trust’s Montacute House blog has posted about a suite of embroidered furniture. One of the chairs is protected from the sun by a bold check case which I presume … Continue reading

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Furniture Brasses

In the early seventeenth-century, furniture fittings – handles, hasps, hinges and locks – were wrought from iron by black- and whitesmiths; often with surprising finesse. Whitesmiths also produced tinned iron fittings which, when new, would have shone like silver, but … Continue reading

Posted in Cabinet Fittings | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

Mahogany in the Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Centuries

Mahogany has been called the furniture timber and was certainly the most important commercial timber of the eighteenth-century. Its massive trunks afforded hitherto unobtainable wide boards which soon found their way into English dining rooms as tables and sideboards – … Continue reading

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Ash in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth-Centuries

The common ash or European ash (Fraxinus excelsior) is native to Europe and as far east as Turkey. It is a deciduous tree attaining a height of 20-30 metres (65-100 feet). The common ash.   Ash buds, foliage, keys and … Continue reading

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A Hepplewhite Sofa

I am instructed we need a new sofa – and I have to agree really. The pair of sofas we dragged here from our previous location is typical of much modern commercially made furniture; they suffer a total absence of … Continue reading

Posted in Seating | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Fancy a Screw?

I’ve always fancied screws. That such a devilishly cunning device with no moving elements can impart immense force through simple rotation is nothing short of brilliant. Brilliance was Leonardo da Vinci’s code; he no doubt looked at Archimedes’ water screw … Continue reading

Posted in Fasteners | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

Glue, not Adhesive

Cabinetmaker’s glue, also known variously as bone glue, hide glue, pearl glue, Scotch glue and most appropriately, animal glue, is all just collagen, rendered down from left over bits of cattle and retired thoroughbreds. My preferred nomenclature is ‘horse sauce’. … Continue reading

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